How to Market a Complicated Product or Service

by Victor Cheng

My latest area of interest has been the field of linguistics and communications.  At first, this seems like an odd topic, particularly in the context of creating revenue growth, but I’ve since come to realize its direct relevance.

Leadership, revenue growth, and execution all have their roots in one’s ability to communicate with others.

Imagine if you were not allowed to talk or e-mail your staff; what are you chances of success?  None.

What if you were prohibited from talking or communicating with your prospects?  You’d be dead meat.

So, clearly, the ability to communicate is a fundamental component to creating revenue growth.

Along those lines, it makes sense that if communicating is the key to growth, then communicating WELL is equally important.

One of my pet peeves is the amount of jargon present in everyday language among tech companies.  I met someone the other day at a tech social function, and, for 10 minutes, I was trying to figure out what in the world this person was talking about.

While an elevator pitch is essential to raising funding, it’s also critical to getting customers, too.

So, drop the scalable, faul-tolerant, industry leading, next generation, Web 2.x, multi-threaded, infrastructure, virtualization, best-of-breed, services-based, multi-gigawatt flux capacitor language… and just spit it out in plain English, so your own mother could understand it.

Here’s a simple video from PR web that provides a surprisingly good example:

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